• Fighting AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

    The substantial increase in resources dedicated to health through development assistance and other sources in the last ten years is changing the trajectory of AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria, as well as other health problems in low- and middle-income countries.

    Much more remains to be done, but there are signs of a dramatic turnaround in the fight against these devastating diseases. New HIV infections are declining in many of the countries most affected by the epidemic. More and more countries are in a position to target the elimination of malaria from their territories. The world is on course to halve TB mortality by 2015 in comparison with 1990.

    Since its inception in 2002, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has been a major engine driving this remarkable progress.

    Soon after its founding, the Global Fund became the main multilateral funder in global health. It channels 82 percent of the international financing for TB, 50 percent for malaria, and 21 percent of the international financing against AIDS. It also funds health systems strengthening, as inadequate health systems are one of the main obstacles to scaling up interventions to secure better health outcomes for HIV, TB and malaria.

    Programs supported by the Global Fund have made an increasingly significant contribution to the international targets for key services such as the provision of lifesaving antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV, TB treatment under DOTS and insecticide-treated nets to prevent the transmission of malaria.

    The Global Fund closely tracks the results flowing from its direct investments in more than 140 countries. These are available by disease, country and region in the Grant Portfolio, and summarized in the annual results report. The report also summarizes the results and signs of impact of the national programs the Global Fund supports.